All blog posts from Dr. Allott are provided for educational and informational purposes only. As Dr. Allott is also a licensed medical practitioner, we must make it clear that nothing on the blog is intended to constitute medical advice, consultation, recommendation, diagnosis, or treatment. If you are concerned about your health, please seek appropriate care in your area.


Not Hungry in the Morning?

breakfast-1246686__340.jpg

You or someone you know may not be eating breakfast. "I’m just not hungry." Or you have breakfast when you get to work – 2 hours later. Just to be clear, breakfast is the meal that breaks the sleep fast, and your body expects to receive food within one hour of waking. 

Why would someone not be hungry in the morning? It’s not because you ate a big meal in the evening. I know when I have my Thanksgiving meal at noon; I am hungry again before bed. 

So why don’t you feel hungry when you wake up? If your glucose (brain fuel) level dropped too low while you were sleeping, your liver would have already received the signal to deliver a cocktail of hormones that tells the body to make fuel for the brain – and part of the cocktail is adrenaline. When adrenaline is in the system, we tend not to feel hungry. Historically, adrenaline signaled that someone or something was trying to hurt us and we should run; running and eating are not tightly wired together. 

Clinically, the short-term consequences of skipping breakfast happen about 8 hours later. You might be fatigued, and your lizard brain takes charge. This increases the likelihood that you will overeat, have more alcohol before or at dinner than planned, and have passive evenings.

What are the long-term consequences of skipping breakfast?  When we skip breakfast, we set up a cascade of stress hormones that are working to maintain our fuel supply. The most recent studies suggest that not eating breakfast causes:

  • increased calorie intake during the day,
  • Increased stress/inflammatory hormones, such as cortisol and insulin,
  • increased weight gain and adipose tissue/body fat,
  • increased cholesterol and blood pressure, and 
  • increased cardiovascular disease.

What to do about the fact that you just don’t feel hungry? Typically, a quarter cup of fruit juice or some other quick-acting sugar, such as a teaspoon of honey, will get your body to send the hunger signal within 20 minutes. Then, you can have breakfast. For the people who are not eating because they are jumping out of bed to go to work, try putting a protein shake in the refrigerator the night before so you can grab it on your way out in the morning. If you do this for about a week, you might find that your hunger signal kicks in more easily in the mornings. 

Do you skip breakfast? Try the experiment of starting your day with food that has protein (14-20 grams) + carbs + fiber + fat. This Shortcuts post has some ideas for breakfast. Observe the following changes:

  • less anxiety, irritation, and agitation in the mornings
  • more energy and mental clarity in the day
  • less overdoing intake of sugar, alcohol, or snacking 8 hours after waking
  • better sleep 
  • increased ability to participate in after-work activities that are important to you. 

Tell us about your experience on the Dynamic Paths Facebook page or add a comment to our blog. 

Fuel for Thoughts: Panic Attacks in High Functioning People

zen-2907290_640.jpg

Have you ever known someone who seemly had it all together? And then, she or he seemed to spiral downward with anxiety and depression, even though it seemed out of character. Brad Stulburg, a published author on productivity and performance, recently published an article on his experience with anxiety and panic attacks. I have been following his blog lately because he encourages mindfulness, sleep, and exercise for executives. His anxiety and panic attacks are completely new phenomena to him. He writes candidly about the impact this had on his life and his advice toward the path out.

I was intrigued when Brad shared about the day of his first panic attack: his hadn’t fed his body well during the day, and after exercise he had an alcoholic drink and snacked on potatoes chips. We’ve all done it. You meet some friends at a bar for a drink after a long day and there is no real food available. This combination set up the event of his hypoglycemia (low blood glucose for the brain) and - in my opinion - a shot of adrenaline that was at a survival dose rather than risk taking/excitement dose.

This combination made his amygdala (the reactive/lizard part of the brain) hyper-sensitized to adrenalin. Emotionally, there was no good story about why his adrenalin hit was so high – no attack, no accident. So his brain is trying to find an emotional meaning for the event, when perhaps it was his physiology that was the driver of the adrenaline.

Exercise + refined carbs + alcohol + normal aging process = big release in insulin + sharp drop in glucose + big release in adrenaline = Anxiety and Panic attacks. 

This day of poor self-care set in motion his reactive brain trying to be in charge of his mind, and he has been working hard ever since to regain and maintain his mental health. This can happen to anyone. His example illustrates the importance of nutrition for taking care of one's body to maintain a stable brain and mind. His courage to share his experience helps us all know that we can return to health.

Question: How can we create food safety nets for ourselves and others? Can we keep protein bars or nuts in our bags? Or throw a box of protein bars into the truck of our teenager? Can we ask to meet at bars that have food? 

Share your thoughts by commenting below.